Economics of Jewish Education

How might environmental concerns about the economic status of Jewish families in North America determine how Jewish education should look in the future?

Jewish education is resource-intensive for both consumers and producers.

By looking at the entire network of stakeholders in Jewish education — families, schools, camps, foundations, communal institutions, synagogues — CASJE aims to better understand the dynamics between them and to explore the financial solvency of Jewish education at large. Can Jewish education continue in its current form? Does it need to be changed? If so, how? How might other environmental concerns about the economic status of Jewish families in North America impact how Jewish education should look in the future?

Pirke Avot reminds us that without material support there can be no Torah (Avot 3:17). We know a great deal about Torah, but we know precious little about the material support that allows learning to take place.

Ari Kelman, Stanford University

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